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Letter From The Editors

  • People & Place

What’s the point of talking about good business?

We know we have to do better.

What’s the point of talking about good business?

 

Is it because we want things to change? To encourage people along on the ride? To capture the renewed interest in responsible business that has only been heightened by the Covid-19 pandemic?

 

It’s all of those things, and more. But who gets to decide what’s ‘good’ and what’s relevant or worthwhile, if our business community only represents a narrow slice of opinion? If it doesn’t recognise all voices and experiences equally?

 

Our business horizon is crammed with, largely, middle aged white men. It’s the default setting.

 

And that’s the heart of the problem.

 

What incentive is there to change when the people that make all of the decisions are doing OK? If we rely on individuals, rather than structural change, is business *really* changing?

 

When we set out to do this – our two-act festival and the journal – we wanted it to be diverse. Representative. And accessible. But the potency of and reaction to the Black Lives Matters movement over the last month has shown us how far there is to go, and that’s pretty confronting.

 

We know how much work there is to do to tell the whole story. We know we have to do better.

 

We have to listen more, and to act decisively. Tell us, if you want to tell us, how you think we can do better. And we will be proactive in our decisions, too. We will introduce at least one new writer for every future issue; we’ll actively commission more people of colour to write and share their ideas and opinions.

This is our second issue and we’re committed to this using it as a platform to grow diversity of thought and ideas. In this issue we talk about mental health in the workplace, and we speak to our correspondents around the world about the changes they’re seeing on the business landscape; we look at the impact of Covid-19 on businesses in Africa – a continent that has much more experience than us from its fight against AIDS and ebola. And we look to future good businesses as we talk about B Corps and the sustainable development goals. The picture is building. But there’s much more to do.

 

Thanks to Michael Patrick for his photos of Black Lives Matter protests in Liverpool in June 2020. Follow @michae1patrick to see more of his work.